2009 Chateau Margaux

Chateau Margaux
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Chateau Margaux vintage 2009 1er Cru Classe, Margaux including the vat and duty

Tasting notes, Robert Parker, Rate 99, A brilliant offering from the Mentzelopoulos family, once again their gifted manager, Paul Pontallier, has produced an uncommonly concentrated, powerful 2009 Chateau Margaux made from 87% Cabernet Sauvignon and the rest primarily Merlot with small amounts of Cabernet Franc and Petit Verdot. As with most Medocs, the alcohol here is actually lower (a modest 13.3%) than most of its siblings-. Abundant blueberry, cassis and acacia flower as well as hints of charcoal and forest floor aromas that are almost Burgundian in their complexity are followed by a wine displaying sweet, well-integrated tannins as well as a certain ethereal lightness despite the wine's overall size. Rich, round, generous and unusually approachable for such a young Margaux, this 2009 should drink well for 30-35+ years.

The Grand Vin de Château Margaux has been recognized since the 17th century as one of the greatest wines in the world.
It owes its qualities unique to the genius of its terroir as well as to the passionate work of a succession of generations. It is a remarkable wine that comes from a combination of characteristics that are rarely found: finesse, elegance, complexity, density, intensity, length and freshness. Although its tannic concentration is often exceptional, it is rare to detect astringency.


The great vintages are distinguished by their formidable ability to move us. The small vintages are the delight of savvy amateurs. They have the advantage of evolving more quickly and reveal, after a few years, lack of power, this subtlety that is the prerogative of the great terroirs.

Chateau Margaux has an extraordinary capacity for evolution. With the years, it develops a finesse, an aromatic complexity and a remarkable presence in the mouth.

The history and fame of Château Margaux are as much due to the genius of the place as to the contribution of the men and women who have served it for five centuries. But no landlord will probably have played such a decisive role in such a short time as André Mentzelopoulos, who acquired the estate in 1977 and would have been 100 years old today.

200 years ago, the Marquis de la Colonilla had already marked the estate by building, in honor of the wine, this great architectural heritage inspired by ancient Greece; The architect Louis Combes had designed the peristyle of the castle as a tribute to the Parthenon. Andre Mentzelopoulos felt pride and happiness at the sight of those Ionic columns that reminded him of his native Greece. More than 160 years later, he was able to take the necessary steps to restore to Château Margaux, in just three years, the luster he had lost during the long crisis of Bordeaux wines.

Adding a modern building to this Historical Monument was certainly bold, but Norman Foster was able to meet the technical and aesthetic challenges that were those of Château Margaux. The new buildings designed by Norman Foster live up to the architectural requirements of the past of the Estate, while offering it the opportunity in the future to pursue its quest for excellence through the renewal of technology. Château Margaux now has, for a long time, an architectural heritage and tools to match the reputation and quality of its wine.

The director Bruno Aveillan told the story of the encounter between the Marquis de la Colonilla and Louis Combes, and then, 200 years later, the heavy task entrusted to Norman Foster; Design the new cellars that will anchor Château Margaux in the future while respecting existing buildings. The film "Prodigy of the Architect" was presented during the summer of 2015 on the occasion of the bicentenary of the architecture of Château Margaux.

Louis Combes and Norman Foster, two centuries apart, were inspired by the genius of a secular terroir by paying tribute to one of the greatest wines in the world.